/ Home / Library / Classical Literature / Adventures of Tom Sawyer / Introduction Page 1

Adventures of Tom Sawyer: Introduction Page 1 of 1
by Mark Twain

Introduction Jump To

Printable version of this page


MOST of the adventures recorded in this book really occurred; one or two were experiences of my own, the rest those of boys who were schoolmates of mine. Huck Finn is drawn from life; Tom Sawyer also, but not from an individual -- he is a combina- tion of the characteristics of three boys whom I knew, and therefore belongs to the composite order of archi- tecture.

The odd superstitions touched upon were all preva- lent among children and slaves in the West at the period of this story -- that is to say, thirty or forty years ago.

Although my book is intended mainly for the en- tertainment of boys and girls, I hope it will not be shunned by men and women on that account, for part of my plan has been to try to pleasantly remind adults of what they once were themselves, and of how they felt and thought and talked, and what queer enterprises they sometimes engaged in.



<< Previous Page | Next Page >> Go to Top of Page Go to Printable Version

Looking for a job in the education sector? Visit Education America Network (for US job postings) or Education Canada Network ((for Canadian opportunities).


Re-use/reproduction of some materials may be limited, please see our Acceptable Use Guidelines.
© 2001-2004 World of Education